Media Policy Podcast Archives

Rebekah Tromble: How to Combat Misinformation (Ep. 154)

How to Combat Misinformation

Rebekah Tromble (@RebekahKTromble) is an assistant professor in the Institute of Political Science at Leiden University in the Netherlands, where she teaches and conducts research on media and politics, digital research methods and ethics, and computational social science.

Francella Ochillo: Latinos and Tech Policy — The Policy Year Ahead (Ep. 153)

Latinos and Tech Policy — The Policy Year Ahead (Ep. 153)

Francella Ochillo (@Francella202) is the National Hispanic Media Coalition’s (NHMC) Vice President, Policy and General Counsel.

Otessa Ghadar: How to Tell Your Story (Ep. 151)

Otessa Ghadar: How to Tell Your Story (Ep. 151)

Otessa Ghadar joined Joe Miller to discuss her tips on how to tell your story, the DC independent film scene, and DC’s punk rock roots.

Desmond Patton: Understanding Social Media and Gang Violence (Ep. 127)

Desmond Patton: Understanding Social Media and Gang Violence (Ep. 127)

Dr. Desmond Upton Patton (@SAFELab) is an assistant professor at the Columbia School of Social Work and a Faculty Affiliate of the Social Intervention Group (SIG) and the Data Science Institute. His research utilizes qualitative and computational data collection methods to examine how and why youth and gang violence, trauma, grief and identity are expressed on social media and the real world impact they have on well-being for low-income youth of color.

Chris Snook: How to Make Your Advocacy More Relevant (Ep. 124)

How to Make Your Advocacy More Relevant

Chris J Snook (@chrisjsnook) is the Bestselling Author of Digital Sense: The Common Sense Approach to Effectively Blending Social Business Strategy, Marketing Technology and Customer Experience (Wiley, 2016). He is a Managing Partner at Launch Haus, a venture capital firm focused on cryptocurrency, blockchain, enterprise software, consumer products, digital marketing, event/media properties, and service businesses. He is also a Chairman and Founder of the WorldTokenomicForum ,the leading international organization for enabling public-private cooperation, interoperability, and innovation in token and blockchain based technology. He is also an INC magazine contributor.

Carmen Scurato: The FCC’s Attack on Civil Rights (Ep. 118)

The FCC’s Attack on Civil Rights (Ep. 118)

Carmen Scurato (@carmenscurato) is Vice President, Policy and General Counsel at the National Hispanic Media Coalition, where she leads NHMC’s policy and government affairs office in Washington, D.C. She is responsible for developing policy and legal strategies that encourage open and affordable communications, innovation, competition, and diversity. Carmen represents NHMC in meetings with decision makers in Congress and at federal regulatory agencies. She has spoken extensively on the ways that communications policy impacts people of color and regularly appears in outlets such as Fast Company, Fortune, The Root and the Guardian to highlight NHMC’s policy and advocacy efforts.

Cheryl Leanza: How Trump’s FCC Plans to Change the Media Ownership Rules (Ep. 114)

Cheryl Leanza: How Trump’s FCC Plans to Change the Media Ownership Rules (Ep. 114)

Cheryl A. Leanza (@cleanza) is the President of her consulting firm, A Learned Hand, LLC, www.alearnedhand.com.  In this capacity she serves as policy advisor to the United Church of Christ’s historic media advocacy arm and as the Co-Chair of the Leadership Conference of Civil Rights Media & Telecommunications Task Force.  Her other clients have included the Progressive States Network, Leadership Conference Education Fund, National Federation of Community Broadcasters, Future of Music Coalition, Public Knowledge, and Native Public Media, among others.

Larry Miller: How Radio Can Survive in the Era of Streaming (Ep. 111)

Larry Miller: How Radio Can Survive in the Era of Streaming (Ep. 111)

Larry Miller (@larrysmiller) is a Clinical Music Associate Professor and Director of the Music Business Program at NYU. He is also a music and technology entrepreneur and advisor and host of the Musonomics podcast.

Racism Online — Detecting Stealthy Bigotry with Rijul Magu (Ep. 95)

Racism Online — Detecting Stealthy Bigotry with Rijul Magu (Ep. 95)

America’s History of Recalcitrance De jure discrimination Racism online is evolving in a way that is consistent with the way racism has always evolved–from explicit to subtle. Plaintiff-side civil rights lawyers have found it easiest to win — if civil rights cases can ever said to be “easy”– in cases in which they can convincingly demonstrate defendants’ explicit discriminatory policies. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, the United States Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. Board